Los Angeles presentation, January 2016

Los Angeles presentation, January 2016

Jennifer Stoots, a certified appraiser of photography, and I are doing a presentation in Venice, CA, on January 24, 2016. Register at this link and learn more about it, below. Jennifer is also doing a related panel discussion, featuring an attorney and other experts, on January 20, 2016. Learn more about the panel at the registration link. Workshop: Orchestrating Your Legacy for artists, photographers, and filmmakers This 2-hour workshop will give artists, photographers and filmmakers the information they need to understand how legacies are built and preserved, by way of good business practices and estate planning. Includes a planning workbook. DATE:    Sunday January 24, 2016 PLACE:    Studio 852, Rialto Court    Venice, CA TIME:    2:00 – 4:00 p.m. COST:    $99 early registration; $130 regular registration (after January 11) REGISTER:    artistslegacies.eventbrite.com This workshop takes participants from basic orientation about estate planning all the way through to small details relevant to artists, with regards to inventory and intellectual property. Limited to 25 participants. Inquire about discount for a second person from the same studio. Topics include: Introduction to estates and wills for artists, photographers and filmmakers Roles and transitions for families and business partners Studio practice and record keeping Understanding appraisals and valuation Best practices to minimize taxes Choices for placement of an archive and related assets Considerations when choosing an executor Examples of families who’ve successfully stewarded reputations into history Participants will receive ideas and paths to building their own artistic legacy and how best to prepare their archive and executors. Instructors Jennifer Stoots, AAA, and Robin Moore, MBA, will provide a structure and workbook so that any artist can create a...
May 2015 presentations, NYC area

May 2015 presentations, NYC area

In May 2015, I gave two free presentations in the NY area. Here’s how I described them: Learn the basic steps you must do to make sure your artwork is treated appropriately after you pass. A few simple choices can make the difference: will you leave your loved ones a burdensome duty or a cherished legacy? For most artists and other creatives, the situation is not easy to think about, but it’s not optional, either. You’ll leave my presentation with background, understanding, and some tips and tricks that will support you in planning the afterlife of your artwork. Presentation title: Artists’ Estate Planning and Cataloging your Work Description: What will happen to your artwork after you die? Will your loved ones inherit huge tax bills? Most artists have nightmares of their work ending up in dumpsters, but few have useful inventories or appropriate wills. Artist estate consultant Robin Moore’s presentation will dispel many of your fears. She’ll provide down-to-earth tips and practical tools to get you started. (This workshop is a supplement to last January’s Estate and Cataloging presentation.) Two upcoming dates: In Long Island: Date: Thursday, May 14, 2015, 7:30 pm Location: Syosset Library (South Oyster Bay Road and North Service Road of the LIE) Sponsored by the Long Island Craft Guild. Free. No RSVP required. Facebook event here. In Manhattan: Date: Friday, May 15, 2015, 6:30 pm Location: School of Visual Arts (SVA) Annex, 214 E. 21st Street, Room 702A. Sponsored by the Society of Scribes. Free but please RSVP here. Facebook event here. Questions? I’d love to hear from you....
Artists: learn about estates and inventories, April 27 at WPA

Artists: learn about estates and inventories, April 27 at WPA

I’ll be presenting at the Washington Project for the Arts on April 27, from 2 to 4 pm. Learn the basic things you must do to make sure your artwork is treated appropriately after you pass. A few simple steps can make the difference between leaving your loved ones a burdensome duty and leaving them an honored legacy. It’s not easy to think about, but it’s not optional, either. You’ll leave my presentation with background, understanding, and some tips and tricks that will support you in planning the afterlife of your artwork. Estate Planning and Cataloging your Work: Part 2 Date: Sunday April 27, 2014, 2-4pm Location: Lounge at The Capitol Skyline Hotel, 10 I (eye) Street SW, Washington, DC 20024 What will happen to your artwork after you die? Will your loved ones inherit huge tax bills? Most artists have nightmares of their work ending up in dumpsters, but few have useful inventories or appropriate wills. Artist estate consultant Robin Moore’s presentation will dispel many of your fears. She’ll provide down-to-earth tips and practical tools to get you started. (This workshop is a supplement to last January’s Estate and Cataloging presentation.) Free to WPA members; others pay $10. All should RSVP to Deena Hyatt at WPA. More info and list of attendees on Facebook. Questions? Email me. This presentation is part of WPA’s Professional Practices series. Find out more about becoming a member of WPA...

The Art Cart: Saving artist’s legacies

One of my key sources of information as I help artists plan their legacies, and create inventories of their life’s work, has been the Art Cart, a project of the Research Center on Arts and Culture. Researcher Joan Jeffri from Columbia University has studied artists extensively: her reports, including Above Ground, make for delightful reading both for nerds and those who know and love artists (I count myself in both categories!). Through the Art Cart project, 20 artists in New York and Washington, DC, have been able to document their careers, with a high level of professionalism, with photographs. The video below gives you a great sense of the project and the benefits, both for participating artists and for society as a whole. The video, like the project, is full of heart and life and what makes artists tick. Please view it! One idea, for example, is that artists tend to do well as they age — and there may be things we can learn about resilience among older people that studying artists can demonstrate. Less heartening are the numbers about artists and their legacy preparations. Jeffri’s research, based on studying hundreds of older artists, gives these startling statistics: 61% of professional visual artists age 62+ have made no preparation for their work after their death 95% have not archived their work 1 in 5 have no documentation of their work at all) 97% have no estate plan 3 out of every 4 artists have no will While the project can only take on a few artists each year, you can always start an inventory. Learn more about artists’...